Search results for: 'category key'

Suggested search terms: category keYHOle

  • We carry around 200 different keyhole escutcheons in a variety of styles in both iron and brass. Escutcheons can be divided into two distinct categories. Surface mounted types that are simply pinned or screwed over the keyhole and "Thread" escutcheons that are mortised into the keyhole and show as a keyhole shaped brass line (thread). A third style called the flanged thread escutcheon has attributes of both, its body is mortised into the keyhole while it's bead-like flange sits on the surface. Sur...
  • Yesterday The need to secure precious objects is so innate to humans and many other animals that it is not surprising the earliest locks appear as long ago as 4000 years. The oldest known locks employed a pin tumbler mechanism much like that of our modern "Yale" lock but on a far larger scale. They have been found in cultures as diverse as those of Egypt, Japan and Norway. The Romans can be credited with the invention of the metal lock and in fact developed the "warded lock" which uses the familiar ske...
  • Door & Drawer Locks Locate the center of the drawer front (or the appropriate position on the door if mounting a door lock). Using the lock as a template, mark its outline on the back and upper edge of the drawer front. Be aware that the key pin is usually offset to one side of the lock and it is the key pin that must be centered on the drawer. With a sharp knife, ruler and square go back over these lines. Use a router or chisel to create the shallow mortise for the lock plate (I use a 1/4" high s...
  • Many cabinetmakers build jigs to speed up repetitive tasks. Installing thread escutcheons could well be a candidate for this approach. I have never been a jig enthusiast, either I'm too lazy or because I have seen too many craftsmen design work to suit existing tools, cutters and jigs rather than the other way around. A thread escutcheon is a short keyhole shaped brass tube that is set into a matching mortise. Our thread escutcheons are cut from long extrusions of the required section and are very cons...
  • Catches come in a bewildering assortment of function and design. In very general terms a catch is any device whose purpose is to hold two or more components together while allowing for easy release. Quite what distinguishes a catch from a latch is unclear to me so we will group them together for the sake of this guide. Locks are dealt with elsewhere and are considered distinct from catches. Door Catches Door catches can either be mounted to show on the outside of the door or the can be mo...
  • A full mortise lock is embedded into a deep mortise cut into the edge of the door or drawer. The exposed "selvedge" and a keyhole are all that is visible of this type of lock. Unless some unusual consideration comes into play these locks are generally centered in the thickness of the material. Because the lock is normally placed in the middle of the material thickness the choice of escutcheon and the method of its attachment will be a consideration. Thread escutcheons rely on a viable thickness for s...
  • Offset knife hinges provide an unobtrusive way to hinge an inset door. Fitting is as shown above and so long as the mortises are cut accurately before assembly installation should present no particular challenge. Accurately is the keyword here. The whole aesthetic of this kind of hinge is lost if door fit is poor and very little adjustment is possible after installation. To provide a little adjustment after installation the door mortise can be cut a little short and the hinges installed with a si...